Daily Archives: July 25, 2011

Monkey Bread and The Sensitive Cook

Galatians 5:25  If we live by the Spirit, let us also walk by the Spirit.

The best synonym for self-control is “discipline.”  Interesting word self-control. We use it often but rarely analyze it, even when we come across it in the Bible. Self-control means “inner strength.”  The fruit of the Spirit is self-control. Self-control frees us from slavery. Self-control stops bad habits. It checks us. It halts us. When it comes to retaliation, self-control restrains us. Without it, we gear up to get even.    (thoughts by Charles Swindoll)

Recently we were gathered for a family wedding and as often happens conversation turned to food and favorite recipes.  In our family “Monkey Bread” has been a favorite breakfast treat for years.  The first time I made this after my husband and I were married I waited anxiously for him to say how he liked it.  He ate up a hefty portion, but didn’t say anything.  Finally, I couldn’t stand it any longer and I said, “well, what do you think?”  He smiled and said, “I think you should keep practicing.” As is his nature, he was trying to be cute and tell me he wanted me to make it often, but of course I got indignant and said “practice??!!! – this monkey bread is perfect!”  To this day he will ask me to put in some “practice time” and make monkey bread – and I’ve been practicing ever since. :) He says this blog should really be named   “The Sensitive Cook”!

This is so darn easy and your family will LOVE it!

 A Family Favorite
MONKEY BREAD
4 cans of biscuits – cut each biscuit into quartersShake in bag with:

  • 2/3 cup white sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon cinnamon
  • Nuts optional

Place biscuit pieces in a greased Bundt pan.  Sprinkle layers with nuts, if desired.

Bring to boil:

  • 1 ½ sticks margarine or butter (3/4 cup)
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon vanillaPour mixture over the biscuits and bake 350 degrees for 30 minutes.

Invert on serving place.  Pull apart and eat!!!

Monkey Bread Fresh From The Oven!

 

Cinnamon has been known from remote antiquity. It was imported to Egypt as early as 2000 BCE, but those who report that it had come from China confuse it with cassia.[4]

The Hebrew Bible makes specific mention of the spice many times: first when Moses is commanded to use both sweet cinnamon (Hebrew קִנָּמוֹן, qinnāmôn) and cassia in the holy anointing oil;[5] in Proverbs where the lover’s bed is perfumed with myrrh, aloes, and cinnamon;[6] and in Song of Solomon, a song describing the beauty of his beloved, cinnamon scents her garments like the smell of Lebanon.[7] Cinnamon was a component of the Ketoret which is used when referring to the consecrated incense described in the Hebrew Bible and Talmud. It was offered on the specialized incense altar in the time when the Tabernacle was located in the First and Second Jerusalem Temples. The ketoret was an important component of the Temple service in Jerusalem.

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