Tag Archives: breakfast bread

Sticky Biscuits

Sticky Biscuits
Sticky Biscuits

Here is the problem … these pictures don’t do these sticky biscuits justice. I have tried on several occasions to take just the right picture to make you want to pluck the biscuit right off the page and gobble it up. Well, let me back up ….

Beersheba Vesper Point Cross

Last spring I was at a Community Bible Study leadership retreat at a beautiful conference center in middle Tennessee called Beersheba Springs Assembly.   Besides the stunning site of serene beauty and peace, the kitchen staff is really friendly and prepares delicious  and nutritious meals for the guests.

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Sticky Biscuits layering

As I approached the breakfast bar one morning my eye caught a huge tray that looked like cinnamon rolls or some kind of gooey delight.  As I soon discovered Sticky Biscuits are a morning staple at Beersheba and the cook was more than willing to give me the recipe. In fact, when I approached the kitchen window to ask about the gooey, sweet, yummy biscuits, the cook smiled, moved to a drawer where she extracted the recipe and handed it to me.  She keeps multiple copies on hand because I wasn’t the first or the last to ask for the recipe! But wait there’s more! Click to continue reading

Buttermilk Biscuits & The Chief’s Legendary Gravy

The Chief's Biscuits and Gravy
The Chief’s Biscuits and Gravy

My step-son Bryan was coming for a visit and he sent me a picture of a mile-high biscuit from a restaurant in California, commenting about the “best biscuit” he ever ate.  To a slightly competitive cook that was basically throwing down the gauntlet!

Whenever the kids come home the Chief’s biscuits and gravy are always on the breakfast menu.  My Chief gravy maker use to make the entire breakfast of biscuits and the gravy.  But for many years now I have been the biscuit maker and he makes the gravy.

I only just realized I have never posted the Chief’s gravy recipe.  He says it takes his special touch.  I agree.  However, I am going to share his recipe with you and you can add your special touch to make it your own!


I decided since I needed to crank my biscuits “up a notch” I would go looking for a good ol’ southern buttermilk recipe.  I found the one I wanted on Food.com.

Buttermilk biscuits basting

I chose it because I like the idea of basting the biscuits in buttermilk before baking.  I hadn’t ever done that before.  I used my food processor which helps crumble the dough and butter together to resemble course cornmeal.

I added the other ingredients and the buttermilk just until combined.  The secret to soft, flakey biscuits is to not overwork the dough.  The tendency is to roll it around, pat it, turn it over and keep mixing. However RESIST that temptation and just mix until it holds together.

Buttermilk Biscuits Hot Out Of The Oven!
Buttermilk Biscuits Hot Out Of The Oven!

These biscuits were not mile-high but they are some of the best I’ve ever made! Flaky, soft, buttery, delicious!

Buttermilk biscuits plateful

The Chief's Biscuits and Gravy
The Chief’s Biscuits and Gravy

Topped with homemade strawberry jam or The Chief’s gravy … either way you won’t be disappointed.  I’ve included both recipes  below.

Happy Biscuits and Gravy Breakfast!
~Catherine

Psalm 119-64 Smokey MT

The Chief's Legendary Gravy
 
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My husband was a cook in the navy and he perfected his gravy years ago. Today this gravy is legend in our family!
Author:
Recipe type: Breakfast
Cuisine: Southern
Serves: 8 servings
Ingredients
  • 1 lb. favorite breakfast sausage (We use Williams or Jimmy Dean)
  • 2-3 Tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
  • ½ tsp. garlic salt
  • Salt and Pepper to taste
  • 4 to 6 cups of milk
Instructions
  1. In a large skillet over medium heat cook sausage until well done, crumble fine or leave a little lumpy to suit your own style of gravy.
  2. Add 2-3 tablespoons of flour stirring well to soak up pan drippings.
  3. Add Worcestershire sauce, garlic salt, salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Stir well over medium heat, mixing everything together.
  5. Start adding milk – a little at a time stirring as you go. You can add 4 to 6 cups milk depending on how much gravy you want to make.
  6. Turn heat down and let simmer on low. We simmer for about 1 hour to meld flavors together. During this time add milk as needed to keep gravy consistency. The longer you simmer the gravy the browner it will get. Keep adding milk to keep gravy texture.
  7. Serve over biscuits or try slicing some fresh garden tomatoes and top with gravy.
  8. You can stretch this recipe out adding more flour and more milk. The end result will be less sausage in the gravy but the flavor will be there.
Notes
* The garlic salt and Worcestershire sauce can be increased to suit your taste. Be sure and use a sausage that contains enough fat to give off some grease. Do not use a fat free or low fat sausage.

 

 

Buttermilk Biscuits Southern Style
 
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When your gravy calls for the best biscuits possible, these flaky, soft, buttery biscuits won't disappoint!
Author:
Recipe type: Bread
Cuisine: Southern
Serves: 10
Ingredients
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting the board
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt or 1 teaspoon salt
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, very cold
  • 1 cup buttermilk (approx)
Instructions
  1. Preheat your oven to 450°F.
  2. Combine the dry ingredients in a bowl, or in the bowl of a food processor.
  3. Cut the butter into chunks and cut into the flour until it resembles coarse meal. If using a food processor, just pulse a few times until this consistency is achieved.
  4. Add the buttermilk and mix JUST until combined. If it appears on the dry side, add a bit more buttermilk. It should be slightly wet.
  5. Turn the dough out onto a floured board. Adding flour as necessary, gently PAT (do NOT roll with a rolling pin) the dough out until it's about ½" thick. Fold the dough a couple times, gently press the dough down to a 1 inch thick. Use a round cutter to cut into rounds.
  6. You can gently knead the scraps together and make a few more, but handle as little as possible.
  7. Place the biscuits on a cookie sheet- if you like soft sides, put them touching each other.
  8. If you like"crusty" sides, put them about 1 inch apart- these will not rise as high as the biscuits put close together. Brush with buttermilk.
  9. Bake for about 10-12 minutes- the biscuits will be a beautiful light golden brown on top and bottom.
  10. Do not overbake.
Notes
Recipe adapted from Food.com
Note: The key to great biscuits is in the handling of the dough.
The dough must be handled as little as possible or you will have tough biscuits.
The food processor produces superior biscuits, because the ingredients stay colder and there's less chance of overmixing.
You also must pat the dough out with your hands, lightly.
Rolling with a rolling pin is a guaranteed way to overstimulate the gluten, resulting in a tougher biscuit.
FREEZE: You can make these biscuits, cut them, put them on cookie sheets and freeze them. After frozen wrap in airtight container for up to a month.
When you want fresh biscuits, simply place them frozen on the cookie sheet and bake at 450°F for about 20 minutes.

Weekend RoundUP June 16, 2012

As a father has compassion on his children, so the LORD has compassion on those who fear him;” Psalm 103:13 NIV

Father’s Day weekend is here and there isn’t a better time to rejoice in the fantastic family reunion we enjoyed this past week.  Our family of 36 started with my mother.  Adding my brothers and I.  Then we count brother-in-law, sisters-in-law,  all our children and our children’s children!  What a blessing!  We traveled from Arkansas, Tennessee, Missouri, Colorado, Nebraska, Utah, and Wisconsin!  We converged on Moors Resort sitting directly on the shoreline of Kentucky Lake.  Sunsets looked like this ….
If you are ever looking for a weekend at the lake or a week with family we highly recommend this resort.  It is small enough that we could park our cars and walk from the marina to our cottage, or on to the lodge, via the miniature golf, playground and swimming pool!  The resort includes a restaurant but our lakefront cottages included beautiful full kitchens, widescreen TV’s and internet through the resort. (Even on vacation a Wi-Fi signal is a highly sought after feature!)  I thought I would share a few pictures and as I began looking through the hundreds taken, time flew by and I just had to STOP, put a few together and give you a snippet of what this fun-filled week was like.  If not, I would still be looking at pictures and not writing a thing! 🙂
It was a memory-making week filled with love and joy, fun and fellowship, lots of sun,  swimming, fishing and boating.  The food was fabulous and I will be sharing recipes from the reunion in the future.   All-in-all we thank God for blessing us all with safe travel and a beautiful week together!

Back in cyberspace here is a roundup of the week’s recipes in pictures.  Have a blessed Father’s Day and good luck to everyone who has entered my cookbook giveaway.  The giveaway ends tomorrow night and the winner announced Tuesday!

~ Blessings, Catherine


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Saturday Scones

Colossians 1:13-14

For he has rescued us from the dominion of darkness and brought us into the kingdom of the Son he loves, 14 in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins.

The weekend is a perfect time to try something new along with surprising your family with an awesome treat!  That is the surprise I received this week when our lovely neighbor Gaye, dropped off these stunning blueberry scones just in time for breakfast.  They were still warm and dripping with a light glaze icing.  Her 16 year-old daughter, Abigail, created these scones “tweaking” the recipe this way and that until she made these incredibly light, melt-in-your-mouth scones with blueberries — picked right from the bush this summer!  The exciting thing about this 16-year-old cook is that she is so creative and not a bit afraid to add different ingredients to get the result she wants.  Abigail says, “these are so easy to make, and you can use fresh or frozen blueberries.”  However, I was thinking — if you don’t have any on hand how about trying some … chocolate chips?  Now THAT has your attention!  Give it a try and let me know how you do!

Saturday Scones
A SHARE Recipe from Abigail Hughes
Ingredients:

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon corn starch
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 8 Tablespoons salted butter, softened
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries
  • ½ cup sour cream
  • 1 large egg

1.  Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and preheat to 400 degrees.


2.  In a medium bowl, mix first 6 ingredients.  Cut in butter with fork or pastry cutter.  Mixture should resemble coarse meal.

3.  Stir in blueberries.

4.  In a small bowl, whisk sour cream and egg until smooth.

5.  Using a fork, stir sour cream mixture into flour mixture until large dough clumps form.  Use your hands (or a wooden spoon) to press the dough against the bowl into a ball.  The dough will be sticky in places, and there may not seem to be enough liquid at first, but as you press, the dough will come together.

6.  Place on a lightly floured surface rolling dough into a log about 20” long.  Flatten to make a thick rectangle approximately 1” thick, 4” wide, and 20” long.  Use a sharp knife to cut five 4” squares of dough.  Cut each square in half along the angle line making 10 triangle shaped scones.

7.  Line a baking pan with parchment paper. Place on pan about 1” apart.
Bake until golden, about 15 to 17 minutes.  Cool for 5 minutes and glaze.
Serve warm or at room temperature.

Glaze:
2 cups powdered sugar
1 – 2 Tablespoons milk
Mix, pour in a plastic bag and cut a small hole in the corner.  Drizzle over cooled scones.

The scone is a small British quick bread of Scottish origin. Scones are especially popular in the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Ireland, but are also eaten in many other countries. They are usually made of wheat, barley or oatmeal, with baking powder as a leavening agent. The scone is a basic component of the cream tea or Devonshire tea.

 The pronunciation of the word within the United Kingdom varies. According to one academic study, two-thirds of the British population pronounce it /ˈskɒn/, rhyming with “con” and “John”, with the preference rising to 99% in the Scottish population. This is also the pronunciation of both Australians and Canadians. Other regions, particularly the United States, pronounce the word as /ˈskoʊn/, rhyming with “cone” and “Joan”. British dictionaries usually show the “con” form as the preferred pronunciation, while recognizing that the “cone” form also exists.[1]

The difference in pronunciation is alluded to in the poem which contains the lines:

“I asked the maid in dulcet toneTo order me a buttered sconeThe silly girl has been and goneAnd ordered me a buttered scone.”

The Oxford English Dictionary reports that the first mention of the word was in 1513. The word scone derives perhaps from the Middle Dutch schoonbrood (fine white bread), from schoon (pure, clean) and brood (bread).[2]

The word scone may also derive from the Gaelic term “sgonn” meaning a shapeless mass or large mouthful. The Middle Low German term “Schönbrot” meaning fine bread may also have played a role in the origination of this word. Or, perhaps, the word is based on the town of Scone, Scotland.[3]

Terms such as “Rock Cakes”, “Fat Rascals”, and “Singing Hinnies” are also other terms for what others refer to as a scone.

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