Tag Archives: Chocolate chip

Not All Chocolate Chip Cookies Are Created Sweet and Salty

Walk Through The Bible In One Year
Week 20 reading plan Nehemiah 8 through Job 13
Click on the colored link to read each day’s scripture.
Monday Nehemiah 8 -10, Tues Nehemiah 11-13,
Wed Esther 1-5, Thursday Esther 6-10,
Friday Job 1-5,
Saturday Job 6-9,
Sunday Job 10-13
Blessings as you read!

 We are right in the middle of reading two of my favorite books of the Bible. I adore Esther. She is my kind of woman. When faced with a do and maybe die situation she chose to do the right thing.  We really never know when we are put on this earth for a time such as this.  Esther’s story tells us to be ready at any time to fulfill our God-given purpose.  As far as the book of Job goes I learned a long time ago patience is a virtue for which we should all strive.  Job is a man after my own heart.  I hope these chapters are a blessing to you.
This is the week for our bi-annual family play-date.  This year we are spending 5 days under the sun, eating, swimming, boating, eating, skiing, golfing, and then at the end of the day we gather to eat again!  While just spending time together is our goal, food tends to play a pretty big part too!  I am blessed to live in a family of good cooks.  It isn’t just the women in our family who spend time in the kitchen and at the barbecue grill.  Most of our men know their way around a stove and an oven quite well.  All this talent culminates in to some awesome eating.  I look forward to sharing some of our family reunion food adventures in the near future!

Last week I mentioned that some of my grandchildren, several grand nieces and nephews, and lots of grown-up folks will most likely be looking for sweet nibbles during the day.  To that end we stocked up on Chewy and Craisin Oatmeal Raisin cookies as well as today’s recipe –  Sweet and Salty Chocolate Chip Cookies.

I have never been a very good cookie baker. Some bakers can turn out incredible cookies one right after another.  For me, not so much.  It is for this reason when I see a chocolate chip cookie recipe that has been tried and true I am interested.  It is also the reason that I enlisted the help of my sous-chef dish-washing mom to make these cookies!  The Brown Eyed Baker bakes awesome looking cookies and so I decided to adapt one of her recipes.
Earlier this year I made Sweet and Salty Chocolate Chip bars that are quite astonishing.  I decided I wanted that little bit of salty with the sweetness of these chocolate chip cookies.

True to her testimony these cookies are crispy on the outside and a little chewy on the inside.  I made one change using 1/2 coconut oil for half the butter.  The coconut oil package says that it is great for baking and can be used in place of butter.  It is healthier than butter and has no cholesterol so I wanted to give it a try.  I think it worked well.   A sprinkling of coarse kosher salt on top makes for the perfect combination of sweet and salty.

Since these cookies are going to the “kids” young and old, we decided to add some sticker fun.  We individually wrapped the cookies so they can sit on the counter in Grandma’s cottage and the kidlings can come and get one anytime they want.  (Sorry moms and dads, this is Grandma’s week to rock with the grandkids and great nieces and nephews!)

Don’t Forget …

The Baking With Julia cookbook giveaway is in full swing.  If you haven’t entered your name, check out this LINK to find out how you can enter – several different ways.

Blessings to all and Happy Baking!

The Sweet and Salty Chocolate Chip Cookie

Serves 36
Prep time 45 minutes
Cook time 12 minutes
Total time 57 minutes
Website Adapted From The Brown Eyed Baker
When it is sweet and salty you are craving look no further than these tried and true chocolate chip cookies!

Ingredients

  • 2 1/4 cups All-purpose Flour
  • 1 teaspoon Baking Soda
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 1/2 cup Unsalted butter (1 stick)
  • 1/2 cup Coconut Oil
  • 3/4 cups Granulated Sugar
  • 3/4 cups Light Brown Sugar, packed
  • 1 tablespoon Vanilla Extract
  • 2 large Eggs, at room temperature
  • 1 tablespoon Milk
  • 2 cups Semisweet Chocolate Chips

Optional

  • 1 cup Walnuts or pecans, chopped
  • Coarse Kosher Salt (to sprinkle on top)

Directions

1 Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
2 Microwave butter and coconut oil for 30 seconds, stir and set aside. Don't worry if it isn't completely melted.
3 Combine flour, baking soda, and salt in small bowl and set aside.
4 Beat butter/coconut oil mixture, granulated sugar, brown sugar, and vanilla on medium-high speed until creamy. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add milk and beat until combined. Gradually beat in flour mixture, beating just until combined. Do NOT over mix. Stir in chocolate chips and nuts (if you are adding them.)
5 Refrigerate dough for 15 to 30 minutes. This is an important step as it will solidify the oils keeping the cookies from spreading out too much while baking.
6 Drop by rounded spoonful (I used the small Pampered Chef scoop) onto ungreased cookie sheets. Sprinkle lightly with coarse salt. Bake for 12 minutes or until edges are just brown and the middle is not quite set. Cool on pan for 2 minutes and then transfer to a cooling rack.
7 Make sure cookie sheet is completely cooled before adding more dough to bake. Cookie sheets can be placed in the freezer for 5 minutes or so to cool quickly.
8 mosaicchocchipcookies
When cooled completely wrap individually or in an airtight container. Recipe yields about 3 1/2 dozen cookies.

Note

I used half butter and half coconut oil, but all butter can be used.

 

Sweet and Salty Chocolate Caramel Bars

A Walk Through The Bible In One Year
Bringing the Story to Life

Week 9 reading plan per day:
Click on the colored link to read each day’s scripture.
Monday (Deuteronomy 1) Tuesday (Deuteronomy 2)
Wednesday (Deuteronomy 3-4) Thursday (Deuteronomy 5-7)
Friday (Deuteronomy 8-10) Saturday (Deuteronomy 11-13)
Sunday (Deuteronomy 14-16)

Sweet and salty.  Those two words in the same sentence conjure up all sorts of delectable images in my mind.  I think of salty popcorn and a bite of chocolate all mixed together, or cashews and caramel, or how about peanuts and brittle.  Sweet and salty just goes together!  Recently the Brown Eyed Baker posted a recipe for Salted Caramel Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars.  They are made a lot like chocolate chip cookies, but a layer of caramel and two layers of actual sea salt or kosher salt are sprinkled about.  I shared a link to her post when she made them because I didn’t think I would get away with making them since both my culinary consultants were saying no more sugar, for a while.  But frankly, I just couldn’t stand it.  I just had to taste these little bars.  I attribute that to my heritage.  My Grandma P. was a cookie maker and typical of Eastern Nebraskans every good gathering included cookies and bars!   So, I blame this weakness of mine on Grandma :)
She wouldn’t mind.

Every since I started this blog, I have had a great kitchen set up.  I get to choose recipes, put them together, take some pictures and blog.  While my wonderful sous-chef, dishwasher (mom) will chop, mop, and do dishes.  How lucky am I?  On the sweet and salty day I was making and baking some other recipes and so I asked my sous-chef to make these bars for us.  She did a wonderful job and was very patient while I took pictures from one step to another!
First step goes together almost as if we were making Chocolate chip cookies.  I had some white chocolate chips left from Tuesdays With Dorie Chocolate Truffle Tartlets and so I asked that these be used up in the bars.  Turns out it was great because it really added a nice layering of colors to the bars.  Half of the dough goes into the baking pan, then a nice layer of caramel is spread out evenly. I had so much fun turning sweetened condensed milk into caramel last fall that I had a can on the shelf waiting for just such an occasion as this! Click HERE for my directions for homemade caramel (from when I made Banoffee Pie!)
Start with sweetened milk, cook it, cool it, open it, CARAMEL!

Then comes the salt.  The recipe doesn’t give a specific amount, stating “sprinkle with sea salt.”  Mom was a bit nervous about sprinkling coarse salt over the sweet dough she had just made.  I took one teaspoon of kosher salt (didn’t have sea salt on hand) and as she looked on I sprinkled.
She then layered the other half of the dough on top of our dough, caramel, and salt.  At this point I really loved the confetti coloring of the milk chocolate and white chocolate chips.  FYI – we chose a well-used Pampered Chef  stoneware baking pan.  Doesn’t look too good in the pictures, but it is clean, just well seasoned :)

Lastly, a final sprinkling of salt and into the oven.

When these jewels come out of the oven they smell wonderful and look tasty.  But wait … until the moment your taste buds catch the sweet milk chocolate followed by … aw!  SALT!  It is such an interesting flavor blend that the taste buds just keep asking for more … and more … and more.
Thank you to Two Peas & Their Pod for creating this recipe and to the Brown Eyed Baker for bringing it to my attention.

Bon Appetit’

Sweet and Salty Chocolate Chip Bars

Serves 16
Prep time 15 minutes
Cook time 30 minutes
Total time 45 minutes
Website Adapted From Two Peas & Their Pod via Brown Eyed Baker
Sweet and salty, Bogie and Bacall, love and marriage. Enuf said.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups All-purpose Flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon Baking Soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon Salt
  • 12 tablespoons Unsalted Butter, melted and cooled to room temperature
  • 1 cup Light Brown Sugar
  • 1/2 cup Granulated Sugar
  • 2 Eggs
  • 2 teaspoons Pure Vanilla Extract
  • 1 cup Milk Chocolate Chips
  • 1 cup White Milk Chocolate Chips
  • 1 1/2 cup Caramel (or 10 ounces of caramel candy squares, unwrapped)
  • 3 tablespoons Heavy Cream
  • 2 teaspoons Sea Salt or Kosher Salt For Sprinkling

Directions

1 Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease a 9-inch square pan; set aside.
2 In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, and salt. Set aside.
3 Using an electric mixer, mix together the melted butter and sugars on medium speed until combined. Add the eggs and vanilla and mix until smooth. Slowly add the dry ingredients and mix on low, just until combined. Stir in the white and chocolate chips.
4
In a medium micro-wave safe bowl, combine the caramel (s) and heavy cream. Microwave until the caramel is melted, stirring every 20 to 30 seconds. This will take about 2 minutes if using caramel squares, less time if using caramel from the can.
5
Press half of the cookie dough into the prepared pan, smoothing the top with a spatula. Pour the hot caramel over the dough and spread into an even layer, leaving a little space around the edges. Sprinkle the caramel with sea salt. Drop the remaining cookie dough in spoonfuls over the caramel and gently spread the dough with a spatula until the caramel is covered. Sprinkle the bars with additional sea salt.
6
Bake the cookie bars for 30 minutes, or until the top of the bars are light golden brown and the edges start to pull away from the pan. Cool the bars on a wire rack to room temperature, then refrigerate for about 30 minutes to allow the caramel layer to set. Cut into squares and serve. Store leftovers in an airtight container at room temperature.

Note

(1) Can use all milk chocolate chips and no white chips for same taste result.

(2) Can use sea salt or coarse kosher salt.

PLEEZ Don’t Make These Again … Scotcharoos

Hebrews 1:1-2

God’s Final Word: His Son

 1 In the past God spoke to our ancestors through the prophets at many times and in various ways, 2 but in these last days he has spoken to us by his Son, whom he appointed heir of all things, and through whom also he made the universe.

If finally happened.  After twenty plus years of cooking for my beloved he said those words I have dreaded hearing … “PLEEEESE don’t make these again!”  That is exactly what he said after he consumed his (gulp) fourth Scotcharoo!  “These are waaaay too addicting” he said as he wiped chocolate from the corners of his mouth with a grin.  It all started last Friday when our neighbors invited us to a bonfire and weiner roast.  Knowing there was going to be a gaggle of kids there I decided to make some Scotcharoos.   Kids and anything Rice Krispie seem to go hand in hand.  Besides, this way I could have a Scotcharoo (or two) and not have to stare at the entire pan, nibbling a little at a time until I was sick! (Yes, I have been known to do that.)  However, since it was going to be a crowd I decided to double the recipe, just to make sure everyone had a chance to eat as many as they wanted!  If you have never had a Scotcharoo you may not understand, but if you have eaten them, you know they are ADDICTING!  My plan was going well until I poured the Rice Krispie mix onto my large cookie sheet only to find that I still had a bit left in the pan.  Well, I guess I will just have to put those in a pan to keep at home :)

I made the treats, we went to the bonfire, we each ate a modest amount of Scotcharoos and we escaped without over-indulging.  That is … until we got home and there on the counter sat the over-flow of my double batch of freshly made Scotcharoos.  Just one.  Just one little bite.  Then another, then just a sliver, ohhh we need to even up that side, just one more little bite ….

Scotcharoos

 1 cup sugar
1 cup light corn syrup
1 cup crunchy or creamy peanut butter
6 cups Rice Krispies

Topping:
1 cup butterscotch chips
1 cup chocolate chips

Melt first 3 ingredients, do not over cook.
Add cereal and mix well.

Pour into a greased
9″ x 13″ pan.
(This picture is for a double batch in a 16 1/2″ x 11 1/2″ pan)

Melt chips and spread on the top of krispie mixture.
When cooled, cut into squares.    Enjoy!


Noteworthy:    If you double — be prepared to eat a lot!

nib·ble  (nbl)

v. nib·bled, nib·bling, nib·bles

v.tr.

1. To bite at gently and repeatedly.
2. To eat with small, quick bites or in small morsels: nibble a cracker.
3. To wear away or diminish bit by bit: “If you start compromising too early . . . they nibble you to death” (People).

v.intr.

To take small or hesitant bites: fish nibbling at the bait.

n.

1. A very small quantity, especially of food; a morsel.

2. The act or an instance of nibbling.

Saturday Scones

Colossians 1:13-14

For he has rescued us from the dominion of darkness and brought us into the kingdom of the Son he loves, 14 in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins.

The weekend is a perfect time to try something new along with surprising your family with an awesome treat!  That is the surprise I received this week when our lovely neighbor Gaye, dropped off these stunning blueberry scones just in time for breakfast.  They were still warm and dripping with a light glaze icing.  Her 16 year-old daughter, Abigail, created these scones “tweaking” the recipe this way and that until she made these incredibly light, melt-in-your-mouth scones with blueberries — picked right from the bush this summer!  The exciting thing about this 16-year-old cook is that she is so creative and not a bit afraid to add different ingredients to get the result she wants.  Abigail says, “these are so easy to make, and you can use fresh or frozen blueberries.”  However, I was thinking — if you don’t have any on hand how about trying some … chocolate chips?  Now THAT has your attention!  Give it a try and let me know how you do!

Saturday Scones
A SHARE Recipe from Abigail Hughes
Ingredients:

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon corn starch
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 8 Tablespoons salted butter, softened
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries
  • ½ cup sour cream
  • 1 large egg

1.  Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and preheat to 400 degrees.

2.  In a medium bowl, mix first 6 ingredients.  Cut in butter with fork or pastry cutter.  Mixture should resemble coarse meal.

3.  Stir in blueberries.

4.  In a small bowl, whisk sour cream and egg until smooth.

5.  Using a fork, stir sour cream mixture into flour mixture until large dough clumps form.  Use your hands (or a wooden spoon) to press the dough against the bowl into a ball.  The dough will be sticky in places, and there may not seem to be enough liquid at first, but as you press, the dough will come together.

6.  Place on a lightly floured surface rolling dough into a log about 20” long.  Flatten to make a thick rectangle approximately 1” thick, 4” wide, and 20” long.  Use a sharp knife to cut five 4” squares of dough.  Cut each square in half along the angle line making 10 triangle shaped scones.

7.  Line a baking pan with parchment paper. Place on pan about 1” apart.
Bake until golden, about 15 to 17 minutes.  Cool for 5 minutes and glaze.
Serve warm or at room temperature.

Glaze:
2 cups powdered sugar
1 – 2 Tablespoons milk
Mix, pour in a plastic bag and cut a small hole in the corner.  Drizzle over cooled scones.

The scone is a small British quick bread of Scottish origin. Scones are especially popular in the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Ireland, but are also eaten in many other countries. They are usually made of wheat, barley or oatmeal, with baking powder as a leavening agent. The scone is a basic component of the cream tea or Devonshire tea.

 The pronunciation of the word within the United Kingdom varies. According to one academic study, two-thirds of the British population pronounce it /ˈskɒn/, rhyming with “con” and “John”, with the preference rising to 99% in the Scottish population. This is also the pronunciation of both Australians and Canadians. Other regions, particularly the United States, pronounce the word as /ˈskoʊn/, rhyming with “cone” and “Joan”. British dictionaries usually show the “con” form as the preferred pronunciation, while recognizing that the “cone” form also exists.[1]

The difference in pronunciation is alluded to in the poem which contains the lines:

“I asked the maid in dulcet toneTo order me a buttered sconeThe silly girl has been and goneAnd ordered me a buttered scone.”

The Oxford English Dictionary reports that the first mention of the word was in 1513. The word scone derives perhaps from the Middle Dutch schoonbrood (fine white bread), from schoon (pure, clean) and brood (bread).[2]

The word scone may also derive from the Gaelic term “sgonn” meaning a shapeless mass or large mouthful. The Middle Low German term “Schönbrot” meaning fine bread may also have played a role in the origination of this word. Or, perhaps, the word is based on the town of Scone, Scotland.[3]

Terms such as “Rock Cakes”, “Fat Rascals”, and “Singing Hinnies” are also other terms for what others refer to as a scone.

Yummy Satin Chocolate Glaze

Ruth 1: 16-18   But Ruth replied, “Don’t urge me to leave you or to turn back from you. Where you go I will go, and where you stay I will stay. Your people will be my people and your God my God. 17 Where you die I will die, and there I will be buried. May the LORD deal with me, be it ever so severely, if even death separates you and me.” 18 When Naomi realized that Ruth was determined to go with her, she stopped urging her.

I love the story of Ruth.  In Ruth I see true friendship,  love and devotion.  God created us to need each other and we need friends!  Each day I receive a devotion from Bible Gateway called “Girlfriends In God.”   I am putting the link here for today’s message because it is about Ruth, friends, love and devotion.  If you have time I think it will be worth your while to read.  Blessings from your friend, Catherine.
Girlfriends In God link.

On my Home page, and the other pages within my blog, you will find a couple new items.  If you only read this blog through your email, then you may be missing some things of interest.  If you click through to my actual blog you will find more information, pages, and possibly items of interest.  I change out the prayer (linked from World Outreach) every couple days.  You will also find a link to submit your email address so that each time there is a new posting you will receive it automatically.  And finally, I have included RSS links for automatic posting feeds as well as an RSS – comments feed.  In the comments section you can read all comments within the blog easily put together in this one place.

The other day mom made a yellow Bundt cake to take to our neighbors.  I didn’t want a heavy frosting and I really like the looks of chocolate on the yellow cake.  So I used this Chocolate Glaze recipe.  It makes a glossy chocolate that is a good recipe for cakes, cookies, or donuts.  The best part – few ingredients, fast and easy!

Yummy Satin Chocolate Glaze
INGREDIENTS:

  •  3/4 cup semisweet chocolate chips
  • 1 Tablespoon light corn syrup
  • 3 Tablespoons butter
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

 DIRECTIONS:

  1. Combine all ingredients, except vanilla, in a microwaveable bowl.
  2. Microwave for 1 minute.  Stir well
  3. Microwave for an additional 30 seconds to 1 minute, stopping when all the chips are melted and the mixture is smooth.
  4. Add vanilla.
  5. Spread warm glaze over top of cake, letting it drizzle down the sides.  The frosting will set as it cools.

Optional stop top method:

  1. In a double boiler over hot, but not boiling water, combine chocolate chips, butter, and corn syrup.
  2. Stir until chips are melted and mixture is smooth, then add vanilla.
  3. Spread warm glaze over top of cake, letting it drizzle down the sides.

The Difference Between Frosting, Icing, Crumb Coating, and Glaze

To put a finishing touch on cakes, cookies, and pastries, you have a couple of options:

Frosting, also called icing, is a sweet, spreadable filling and coating used on cakes and cookies. It should have enough body and firmness to hold its shape when applied, but be soft enough to spread easily. Examples of frosting include ganache, buttercream, and royal icing.

A crumb coat is a thin layer of frosting spread on a cake, applied before the final layer of frosting. This initial layer secures stray crumbs and keeps them from showing on the finished cake. It also provides a smooth surface on which to spread the final frosting layer. To apply a crumb coat, use an offset spatula to spread a small amount of frosting on the top and sides of the cake, wiping any crumbs off the spatula with a damp cloth. Chill the cake for 20 minutes or so to let the crumb coat set, and then apply the rest of the frosting.

A glaze is a glossy coating, such as an egg wash brushed on pastry, melted jelly brushed on a fruit tart, or chocolate on a cake. On cakes, the glaze is often applied by being poured gently over the top of the cake and coaxed gently with an offset spatula to create drips down the side of the cake.

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